Tag Archives: Zuni Mountains

The Sky is a Color of Blue Like No Other

a repost by Ethel Mortenson Davis

He said,

“Exceptional people
came from there,
people that did extraordinary
things with their lives
and did amazing things
in the world.”

That place is
in the high desert mountains
where there is a crisscrossing
of invisible lines.

“Our ancients said,

‘This is the center of the earth,
where creation started,
where you and I became,”

a no-nothing place
of mud and rock
and pinion trees,
where the sky is a color
of blue . . .

like no other
in the whole universe.

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Zuni Mountains

a photograph by Sonja Bingen, our daughter

The Red Cliff Country

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A Blur of Wings

a photograph by Ethel Mortenson Davis

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Evening in Continental Divide, NM

We have, over the life of fourwindowspress.com, presented poetry and essays about Continental Divide, New Mexico. It is a small place off Interstate 40 to the east of Gallup. The area has a variety of races and tribes, Navajo, Pueblo (especially Zuni and Acoma), Hispanics, people from the Middle East, and Anglos. The majority of the population are Native Americans. This photograph by Ethel Mortenson Davis is taken just on the other side of the fence around our house looking southwest–more west than south, at sunset. You can see the Zuni Mountains behind the rabbit brush, sagebrush, juniper, cedar, and piñon trees. There are about 360,000 acres of pristine wilderness in the Zuni Mountains. What you cannot see in the photograph are the elk, mule deer, jack rabbits, rattlesnakes, mountain lions, bobcats, lynx, black bears, grizzly bears, cattle, horses, coyotes, and dogs that sometimes make noises in the night that get our two wonderful dogs, Pax and Juneau, barking. This is only one angle from our house. The forest is thicker if you swing the camera lens just a little bit. From our second story you can see the red cliffs to the north and Mount Taylor, the area’s towering mountain rich in Navajo and Pueblo beliefs, to the east. We live in a wild, rural place that presents some challenges–we are sometimes without electricity or water for a day, but that also causes tourists to stop and get out their cameras.

Photograph by Ethel Mortenson Davis

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The Road

by Ethel Mortenson Davis

Because this night
is so cold and beautiful
with a thin-lipped moon
just above the horizon,
we will walk the road.

The road over there–
that is waiting,
the one that climbs
up into the Zuni Mountains.

A man once said
that my poems
were only scratches on paper.

The light is getting late,
and the dogs are anxious.
The poems are waiting out there
in the wildness
to say and be,

themselves.

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New Mexican Monsoon, a pastel by Ethel Mortenson Davis

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